5 Changes To Make To Your Morning Routine, According To Dietitians

5 Changes To Make To Your Morning Routine, According To Dietitians

This article has been republished from AIA Vitality-Vlife September 2017

If the idea of a total overhaul to your eating habits seems overwhelming, start with a simple change at the start of your day. You don’t need to make drastic changes to improve your diet.


For those of us looking to improve our health, the idea of making a drastic change to our diets can seem overwhelming. Thanks to the proliferation of the #CleanEating craze, particularly on social media, it’s easy to assume that any effort to improve our health must be on absolute terms.

1. Make your first meal a piece of cake

Figuratively, not literally, of course. Breakfast is one of the easiest meals to do successfully – especially if you’ve prepared in advance.

“If you’re usually time poor in the morning, get out the breakfast bowls and cereal the night before,” says Clare Collins, a Professor of Nutrition and Dietetics at the University of Newcastle. Having healthy choices ready to go on the counter can stop you from being tempted to skip breakfast or from picking up that sugary muffin on the way to work.

2. Top up your greens

As for what you eat for breakfast? “If you usually have sugar on your cereal, learning to live without will save you 96 kilojoules (23 calories) for every heaped teaspoon you ditch. That’s over two kilograms of sugar per year,” says Clare.

Furthermore, try packing in some of your daily servings of veggies as soon as you wake up.

“Almost all of us fall short of meeting our vegetable requirements,” says accredited dietitian Joel Feren from Hearty Nutrition. “In fact, only six per cent of us eat our five recommended serves each day.”

Try incorporating vegetables into your breakfast by preparing a zucchini breakfast loaf or cauliflower muffins the day before. Alternatively, chop and throw a few of your favourite vegetables into an easy omelette.

 

3. Map out your day

Make sure you carve out enough time in the morning to set yourself up for a healthy day. Even ten minutes is enough to pack a lunch box with healthy leftovers and snacks.

“By taking food with you to work each day, you’ll be less tempted to buy takeaways and/or hit up the vending machine in the afternoon,” says Joel. “Also, packing healthy treats like nuts, fruit, yoghurt or muesli bars is a great way to stay on track.”

4. Take some shortcuts preparing lunch

Just because canned and frozen food is more convenient, it doesn’t necessarily mean it’s unhealthy.

“It’s totally acceptable to use tinned legumes, pre-packaged salad bags, frozen vegetables and cans of tuna,” Joel says. “Most of us, including myself, don’t have time to cook meals from scratch, especially in the morning.

Making use of easy-to-use ingredients will make your life a little easier when it comes to meal preparation.”

If you are using canned food, just check the ingredient list for any added salt.

5. Eat mindfully, one breakfast at a time

There are multiple studies that suggest meditation and mindfulness are a great way to improve our mental health. But meditative practice doesn’t have to be restricted to the yoga mat or your bedroom before you sleep.

According to The Centre of Mindful Eating, preparing and consuming breakfast while distracted has strong links to anxiety, stress and overeating.

With this in mind, our dietitians believe that staying present and listening to your body is the best piece of advice they can give you. If you can, try to stay away from work emails or distractions during breakfast time, and make the most of a 15 minute breather at the beginning of the day.

 

 

This article was originally published here < https://www.aiavitality.com.au/vmp-au/latest_news?selDate=9/2017&article=five_changes_to_your_morning_routine&mkt_tok=eyJpIjoiTVRrd1pXRXdPR1l4TjJNNSIsInQiOiIzZTdadWhVZm45aUkyQzZJY1wvK0FTR1RoSk9SXC9VYzVJNlNzZFNQMkJcL2RiYm9TUUFaR0tSMUJydUlaV21qXC9IWTBxbnNXZ3lOSlhRd2NMN21JSnhHVnltQUp3bHJlUWhac3U1MjJFbkZjQjBWOHVwb3Q5KzAxem1oMUhEMVgwRVUifQ%3D%3D

This is general information only without taking into account the circumstances of any individual. It is not intended as medical, health, financial or other advice. It is current as at the date of publication and may be subject to change. AIA Vitality is available with eligible products issued by AIA Australia. For full terms and conditions of AIA Vitality partners, benefits and rewards, and to view the AIA Vitality Terms and Conditions and Benefit Guides see aiavitality.com.au. Partner terms and conditions may also apply. For material which references AIA Vitality but does not include detailed information: AIA Vitality is available with eligible products issued by AIA Australia. For full terms and conditions of AIA Vitality partners, benefits and rewards, and to view the AIA Vitality Terms and Conditions and Benefit Guides see aiavitality.com.au. Partner terms and conditions may also apply.

McQueen Financial Group is a corporate authorised representative of Total Financial Solutions Limited. AFSL No. 224 954, ABN 94 003 771 579. This information is of a general nature only and does not consider your investment objectives, financial situation or particular needs. You should not act on any information in this report without first consulting a professional investment adviser in order to ascertain whether the information and any investment decision is appropriate. This information is believed to be accurate however no warranty of accuracy or reliability is given in relation to any advice or information contained, and neither TFSA or its Representatives and officers, agents or employees of either of the aforementioned shall not be held liable for any loss or damage whatsoever arising in any way for any representation, act or omission, whether express or implied (including responsibility to any persons by reason of negligence).

5 Top Tips To Managing Your Cashflow And Budgeting

5 Top Tips To Managing Your Cashflow And Budgeting

Cash flow is king.. it’s a cliché that is synonymous with business accountants alike. But for some reason has been lost within our consumer driven lifestyle of today. Understanding your personal finances is the foundation of reaching any sort of success with your financial goals. It is what enables you to travel, buy investments and even go out with friends. The difference between getting it right early can leap frog you in front of your peers quicker than you think.

The stigma attached with cash flow management and budgeting is, that it is boring. There is nothing sexy about budgeting and being accountable to it. However, technological advances have helped liven it up over the last decade. Now more than ever there is almost no excuse to attempting to gain control of your financial future

 

For those that don’t know where to start, here are my 5 tips to managing your cashflow and budgeting.

  1. Set yourself some goals

Goal setting is an integral part of aligning yourself with your finances. Clients who come to us with clear financial goals are generally the clients who have cash in the bank and are fantastic with their money. The key is that having a goal to buy a house or go for that holiday is that your  brain is instantly attached to that goal and is more motivated to achieve it.

Once you set realistic goals for yourself, either financial or non-financial, give that goal a financial number (eg: Overseas holiday in 2018 of $8,000). Again this is just another trigger to engage you more with the actual goal.

  1. Develop a budget and include achieving your goals in it

Once you have developed your goals it’s now time to do the boring side of things… Develop a budget.  While the task of doing it may be boring, you will find that once completed it is actually a rewarding experience.

At this stage your budget is just numbers on a page, it is the link between point no.1 and point no.3 that makes a budget so powerful.

  1. Track your actual spend and measure it against your budget

This does blur lines with my below technology point. However, nowadays it is so easy to be able to track your actual spending with the budget you set for yourself . The important thing to note here is that it allows us to become accountable to the budget we set ourselves. Accountability is key when it comes to budgeting it is made easier by gaining real time feedback on how you’re progressing. Not only with achieving your goals but also on your spending habits that you may like to change is a powerful thing. a

Technology has actually enabled us to be able to be so much more accountable to ourselves… and if you don’t want to be accountable to yourself you can always give someone else permission to look at certain parts of your budget to help you along the way.

  1. Make the most of technology

The financial services industry is currently going through a period of disruption. Technology is making budgeting and cash flow in particular quite easy for everyday users. Nowadays budgeting on the run can literally mean by phone, smart watch or tablet. However, it is hard to know where to turn, with so many options at our fingertips.  Check out my favourite budgeting and cashflow tools and apps here.

  1. Have a Buffer account for a rainy day

This is one of the first things I coach my clients on ensuring they have in place. ‘The Buffer Account’ is an account that has anywhere between 3-6 months worth of saving sitting in it. The financial freedom that comes from having emergency money in the bank is grossly undervalued.

The buffer account gives you peace of mind knowing and understanding that you have the ability to take a risk, go on that holiday or take a few days off work if necessary. It underpins your financial future and allows you to move forward to your goals with confidence. In a society today that is highly leveraged in property and credit card debt you’ll be amazed how rare it is to see people actually doing this.

To finish I’ll close with one of my favorite quotes in which Warren Buffet arguably one of the best investors and cash flow managers of our time lives by to this day, ‘Do not save what is left after spending, but spend what is left after saving’.

It’s a mindset that can set you up for life.

 

Ben Warren

Associate at McQueen Group

Ben Warren is a Financial Adviser  (AR No.: 471844) employed by McQueen Group. McQueen Group is a corporate authorised representative (AR No.: 267498) of Total Financial Solutions Limited. AFSL No. 224 954, ABN 94 003 771 579. This information is of a general nature only and does not take into account your investment objectives, financial situation or particular needs. You should not act on any information in this report without first consulting a professional investment adviser in order to ascertain whether the information and any investment decision is appropriate. This information is believed to be accurate however no warranty of accuracy or reliability is given in relation to any advice or information contained, and neither TFSA or its Representatives and officers, agents or employees of either of the aforementioned shall not be held liable for any loss or damage whatsoever arising in any way for any representation, act or omission, whether express or implied (including responsibility to any persons by reason of negligence).

Helping Your Kids Learn About Money

Helping Your Kids Learn About Money

Do you ever take your child to the supermarket and let them hand the money to the cashier? Or maybe they’ve got their first piggy bank to stash away a few cents here and there?

Whether you know it or not, your children are already developing a relationship with money that will last a lifetime. 

Researchers at the University of Cambridge have discovered that children develop most basic finance concepts by age 7. In 2013, Drs Whitebread and Bingham released a report for the UK’s Money Advice Service which explained that the ‘cognitive and metacognitive processes’ that drive financial thinking emerge at a very young age.i In other words, they might not get compound interest, bank fees or mortgages before they finish primary school, but they will hopefully have developed the pathways in their brain to understand these concepts later in life. These include functions like inhibition (self-control), working memory, and flexibility in applying ‘rules’ of money management.

So what’s the best way to help shape your child’s financial abilities as early as possible? Every parent has their own unique style, and each family’s lifestyle shapes the type of ‘teachable moments’ that are available to them. But whatever specific examples you choose, it’s a good idea to cover a few fundamental forms of learning opportunities. These include:

  1. Observation

From the time they’re born, children can imitate other people’s behaviour. And by the time they’re 18-24 months old, they watch and imitate with intention – understanding that the behaviour has a certain goal or purpose.

Going to the supermarket is a popular example. Grocery shopping might be second nature to you now, but there are dozens of different behaviours and processes that little ones watch. They begin to watch you hand over money in exchange for goods and ultimately are able to understand that different goods are priced differently.

In this digital age, letting your children observe you dealing with physical (notes and coins) money is more important than ever. With the rise of electronic payments, children have fewer opportunities to observe and learn things like the fact that money is finite, and different denominations carry different values.

  1. Instruction

Without a little explanation, children can’t understand why you do things a certain way, or the emotions attached to spending money. ‘Instruction’ means being prepared to answer their questions about why you do what you do with money. It also means being conscious of when they’re watching you closely and taking time to explain your thought process as you act. For example, using the supermarket example, you might explain why you chose a product that’s on sale or why you chose to forego a purchase (i.e. to save money).

  1. Practice

There are ways to teach youngsters about other concepts such as delayed gratification, making the most of finite resources, and saving. It’s also not a bad idea to ensure that children start to understand the concept of money being something that you work for; paying pocket money for simple chores around the house is a great way to illustrate the concept.

Remember, whichever form your teaching takes, it’s never too early to start. Be smart about what your kids observe and experience today, and they’ll reap the benefits as adults.

 

McQueen Financial Group is a corporate authorised representative of Total Financial Solutions Limited. AFSL No. 224 954, ABN 94 003 771 57. This information is of a general nature only and does not consider your investment objectives, financial situation or particular needs. You should not act on any information in this report without first consulting a professional investment adviser in order to ascertain whether the information and any investment decision is appropriate. This information is believed to be accurate however no warranty of accuracy or reliability is given in relation to any advice or information contained, and neither TFSA or its Representatives and officers, agents or employees of either of the aforementioned shall not be held liable for any loss or damage whatsoever arising in any way for any representation, act or omission, whether express or implied (including responsibility to any persons by reason of negligence).

We Chat With Mark From The Bennelong Kardinia

In this video Mark talks about the Bennelong Kardinia Absolute Return Fund. The Bennelong Kardinia Absolute Return Fund is a long/short Australian equity fund with long-term objectives of achieving double-digit annual rates of return and capital protection.

Mark talks us through:

  • The process and strategy of the fund
  • How the strategy was performed
  • How the portfolio is currently positioned

McQueen Financial Group is a corporate authorised representative of Total Financial Solutions Limited. AFSL No. 224 954, ABN 94 003 771 579. This information is of a general nature only and does not consider your investment objectives, financial situation or particular needs. You should not act on any information in this report without first consulting a professional investment adviser in order to ascertain whether the information and any investment decision is appropriate. This information is believed to be accurate however no warranty of accuracy or reliability is given in relation to any advice or information contained, and neither TFSA or its Representatives and officers, agents or employees of either of the aforementioned shall not be held liable for any loss or damage whatsoever arising in any way for any representation, act or omission, whether express or implied (including responsibility to any persons by reason of negligence).

What Is Financial Advice, Financial Planning, Investment Management And Do You Need It?

Sometimes I find it hard to explain what we do and how we charge for it, part of this is due to public misconception and part to where this industry/profession has come from. Most people seeking financial advice expect to pay a fee but they expect their financial dollar return to be greater than that fee – but financial advice is not a transaction and it isn’t an investment service. Financial advice is a service that takes time and expertise, hence the charging of a fee. Not wanting to pay this fee would be like only paying your accountant if you get a tax refund – and if that’s you, I’ll decline to take you on as a client.

In trying to articulate what it is we do as financial advisers I quite like this article written by Ben Carlson. He describes the difference between a financial adviser and an investment manager. I encourage you to have a read of it.

So how do I describe financial advice; it’s a comprehensive fluid financial plan employing the right financial tools to help you achieve what you want out of life.

And your financial Adviser – they are your lifeline or coach, helping you articulate what you want, guiding you emotionally in your choices, spelling out the legal jargon and if needed serving you a harsh reality check. They are your project manager that will help develop strategies to help you get the most out of what you have to work with and will liaise with your other advisers to ensure everything is working toward your objective.

With any personal financial advice there is a mountain of paperwork and financial administration that goes with it – a good financial adviser will have a team that will take care of this for you.

Financial advice is not about generating investment return, that may be one small part of the service they provide you. It is about a stewardship and providing strategies to get what you want out of your hard earned dollars.

 

 

 

Keryn Batsilas  is a Financial Adviser  (AR No.: 436348 ) employed by McQueen Group. McQueen Group is a corporate authorised representative (AR No.: 267498) of Total Financial Solutions Limited. AFSL No. 224 954, ABN 94 003 771 579. This information is of a general nature only and does not take into account your investment objectives, financial situation or particular needs. You should not act on any information in this report without first consulting a professional investment adviser in order to ascertain whether the information and any investment decision is appropriate. This information is believed to be accurate however no warranty of accuracy or reliability is given in relation to any advice or information contained, and neither TFSA or its Representatives and officers, agents or employees of either of the aforementioned shall not be held liable for any loss or damage whatsoever arising in any way for any representation, act or omission, whether express or implied (including responsibility to any persons by reason of negligence).