New Chair Appointed – State Sports Centres Trust

New Chair Appointed – State Sports Centres Trust

Minister for Tourism, Sport and Major Events Martin Pakula announced the appointment of finance expert Chris Jackson as the incoming chair of the State Sport Centres Trust.

The Trust is responsible for governing the Melbourne Sports and Aquatic Centre (MSAC), the State Netball Hockey Centre and Lakeside Stadium.

Mr Jackson is the founder of Accurate Financial Consultants Pty Ltd, an established tax consulting firm with clients in Australia and overseas, which has gone on to merge with our very own McQueen Group. Mr Jackson has wide experience across the finance sector, including serving as the chair of Private Banking Service, a franchise of Bendigo and Adelaide Bank.

Mr Jackson will replace Brett Moore as Trust chair from 1 September, for a term of three years.

Mr Pakula also announced the appointment of former Victorian senator Michael Ronaldson as a member of the Trust.

Mr Ronaldson has more than 40 years of experience in the legal profession, corporate governance and government and was a partner at Ramsay, Gaunt and Fraser before serving in the Senate from 2004 to 2016. His ministerial appointments included Special Minister of State, Minister for Veterans’ Affairs and Minister Assisting the Prime Minister for the Centenary of ANZAC.

Mr Pakula thanked Mr Moore for his 10 years of service to the Trust, including his role in executing the Government’s $64.6 million State Netball and Hockey Centre redevelopment.

The redevelopment works are well under way and will cement Parkville as the home for netball and hockey in Australia with six new indoor netball courts replacing the existing outdoor courts, a new indoor hockey facility and a high-performance strength and conditioning gym.

Quotes attributable to Minister for Tourism, Sport and Major Events Martin Pakula, and to State Sport Centres Trust incoming chair Chris Jackson

9 Tips To Be Productive When Working at Home During COVID-19

9 Tips To Be Productive When Working at Home During COVID-19

When you’re not used to working at home, distractions can lead to lack of focus, procrastination and lower productivity.

During the COVID-19 outbreak, many companies are suggesting—even requiring—that more employees work from home. Working from home can be a lonely enterprise in this era of social distancing, but it doesn’t have to be. For those who are not used to working at home or who don’t have an organized work station, distractions can disrupt your productivity. After all, you’re in your personal space, not your usual professional environment. Laundry needs to be done, dishes washed and the house cleaned.

Plus, maybe you want to see The View since you’re always at the office when it’s on, or there’s a good movie on Netflix you’ve been longing to watch. Your pooch needs to go for a walk or you want to snuggle with him. And your spouse keeps yelling questions from another room, causing you to keep loosing your train of thought. Or on the flip side, maybe since being at home 24/7, you find yourself toiling overtime on the job long after you usually would have called it quits at the office. On top of it all, cabin fever could be sneaking up on you.

Productivity Tips For Working At Home

If you’re not used to working at home, it can take some getting used to new challenges that you might not have at the office. It’s important to have a defined schedule and stick to it. Avoid sleeping in or lingering over breakfast, and get to work just as if you’re driving across town to your office, although you might be walking into the next room. You might think blasting Lady Gaga’s latest hit is the most productive way for you to work. Or loud noises could be the worst thing for you to stay focused and get work done. Everybody is different. Some people work better in clutter while others can’t concentrate unless their work space is tidy. Regardless of your personal style, here are some tips to facilitate adjusting to your new situation during the Coronavirus outbreak:

 

1. Confine your work space to a specific area in your home so your job doesn’t intrude into the lives of other household members and you can concentrate. Have a space that you designate as your workstation instead of checking emails, voicemails or texting in front of TV or spreading work out on the kitchen table. Make your space a stress-free zone of quiet and solitude where you can concentrate. If you don’t have a separate room, find an area with minimum traffic flow or a corner of a room off from the main area.

2. Block the neighbor’s barking mutt, excess noise from household members or ambient traffic with noise cancelling head phones or ear buds. Studies show that a delicate blend of soft music combined with soothing nature sounds—such as waterfalls, raindrops, a rushing brook or ocean waves—activates the calming part of your brain, helps you concentrate and lowers heart rate and blood pressure

3. Go to the same designated place on a regular basis so your mind doesn’t wander, you can focus and increase your productivity. Establish water-tight psychological boundaries so you’re not constantly reminded of temptations around you (there’s chocolate cake in the fridge) or unfinished personal tasks—such as doing laundry, vacuuming or organizing your spice rack—that otherwise could compromise your productivity. And complete these personal activities outside of work hours as you normally would.

4. Set water-tight physical boundaries around your designated work space that is off limits for housemates. Treat it as if it’s five miles across town, and ask house members to consider it as such (e.g. no interruptions from another room when you’re engrossed in a project unless an emergency). If possible, only go to your designated space when you need to work. Stick to a regular schedule, and keep your work space at arm’s-length after hours. Try to maintain the same hours you log in at the office so you don’t get swallowed up by the workload.

5. After a reasonable day’s work, put away your electronic devices and work tools just as you would store carpentry tools after building shelves or baking ingredients after making a cake. Keeping work reminders out of sight keeps them out of mind and helps you relax and recharge your batteries.

6. Discourage personal intrusions. If you’re a teacher or doctor, friends don’t just stop by the office to chat, hang-out or interrupt your work. But sometimes well-intended friends, family members and neighbors think working at home is different. Interruptions and drop-ins can cause you to lose your focus, procrastinate or get behind on a deadline. It’s important to prevent intrusions into your work space by informing others that although the location of your job has changed, it is no different from any other profession requiring privacy and concentration. Notify others that during at-home work hours you’re unavailable and cannot be interrupted. And let them know the after hours when you’re available to connect.

7. Employ your video communications perhaps more than you normally would, now that you’re more isolated. Make sure you have your company’s telecommuting devices—such as Zoom—hooked up and ready to go so you can stay connected with team members or office mates and you’re available for video calls and teleconferencing. If you start to feel lonely, consider setting up a support group of friends and colleagues who are also working at home by satellite. Make plans to meet on a regular basis and share creative ways you’ve adjusted to the new situation.

 

8. Avoid cabin fever. Now that you’re spending a disproportionate amount of time at home, get outside as much as possible with gardening or walking around the block. Mounting research shows that spending time in nature lowers stress, helps you relax and clears your mind. After work hours, enjoy other areas of your home: watching a good movie, reading a book, or cooking a fun meal.The new normal is not to limit social devices but to take advantage of them. Use Facetime, Facebook or Skype with friends and family members so you feel connected to the people in your life that you care about.

 

 

9. Keep your attitude in check. Above all, be creative and don’t let your confined circumstances dwarf your tranquility, happiness or productivity. Your greatest power is your perspective. It can victimize you or empower you. When you look for the upside in a downside situation and figure out what you can control and what you can’t, it’s easier to accept whatever is beyond your control. Your best ally is to find the opportunity in the difficulty during an uncontrollable situation instead of the difficulty in the opportunity. Take advantage of this restrictive time to clear clutter out of your basement, pull weeds in the garden or get caught up on fun hobbies you’ve neglected for a while.

This article was originally published here: https://www.forbes.com/sites/bryanrobinson/2020/03/14/9-tips-to-be-productive-when-working-at-home-during-covid-19/#6395dbfc5a38

International Women’s Day with Business Chicks

International Women’s Day with Business Chicks

 

In celebration of International Women’s Day this week, we invited ten of our amazing female clients to join our table at the Business Chick’s luncheon at Crown Palladium. The event was a wonderful opportunity to celebrate and acknowledge the fantastic achievements of women around the world, represented by three incredible guest speakers; Marita Cheng, Susan Alberti AC and JoAnna Ferrari.

 

Marita Cheng, founder of Robogals & aubot, shared her inspiring journey of persistence which led her to be named the 2012 Young Australian of the Year at a tender age of 23. Along with running robotics workshops for over 70,000 girls across 11 countries, Marita recently launched Teleport Brain Control that allows people with a disability to attend school or work remotely via a telepresence robot.

 

Susan Alberti AC, now an icon of the building industry and key contributor to the formation of the Australian Football League Women’s, shared how her life story of humble beginnings and tragic loss propelled her to become instrumental in promoting juvenile diabetes research in Australia.

 

JoAnna Ferrari showed how she has turned the many challenges in her life into a powerful comeback story and the strategies she has developed over her 30+ years as a successful business leader to embrace change and “harness the power of transitions”.

 

It was an incredible feeling to be surrounded by 1,500 women in the one room who are passionate about empowering and supporting each other.

 

“It doesn’t matter how old you are or how smart you are. All that matters is your imagination and how your creativity can conquer reality.” – Marita Cheng

 

           

 

Old Scotch Football Club Kicks off the Season

Old Scotch Football Club Kicks off the Season

 

Last year McQueen were very proud to sponsor the Old Scotch Football Club (OSFC), it was a big year with 3 of the 5 teams making the Grand Final.

We are very excited to announce that we have renewed our sponsorship for 2018 and are excited for a fantastic year of football.

The start to the season has been particularly exciting as the first ever OSFC women’s team, the “Stars”, was formed. In their debut match the Old Scotch Stars played brilliantly, winning by 5 points.

The Senior’s started strong in their Grand Final rematch but unfortunately went down by 5 points, we look forward to the rematch on 23 June.

 

McQueen Financial Group is a corporate authorised representative of Total Financial Solutions Limited. AFSL No. 224 954, ABN 94 003 771 579.
This information is of a general nature only and does not take into account your investment objectives, financial situation or particular needs. You should not act on any information in this report without first consulting a professional investment adviser in order to ascertain whether the information and any investment decision is appropriate. This information is believed to be accurate however no warranty of accuracy or reliability is given in relation to any advice or information contained, and neither TFSA or its Representatives and officers, agents or employees of either of the aforementioned shall not be held liable for any loss or damage whatsoever arising in any way for any representation, act or omission, whether express or implied (including responsibility to any persons by reason of negligence).

McQueen Group gets behind its own in support of the Cure Brain Cancer Foundation

McQueen Group gets behind its own in support of the Cure Brain Cancer Foundation

We are very proud to announce that our very own Dylan Verney will be competing in the 2018 Noosa Triathlon later this year and has committed to raising $2,000 for the Cure Brain Cancer Foundation in the process!

In our efforts to continually give back to the broader community and support worthwhile causes, we are delighted to show our support for one of our team members as he trains for and competes in Australia’s most famous Olympic distance Triathlon.

The event will take place on 4 November 2018 and involves a 1.5km swim, 40km cycle and 10km run.

If you would like to make a tax deductible donation to the Cure Brain Cancer Foundation and help Dylan on this journey, please click here.

From all the team here at McQueen, we wish Dylan all the best!

 

McQueen Financial Group is a corporate authorised representative of Total Financial Solutions Limited. AFSL No. 224 954, ABN 94 003 771 579.
This information is of a general nature only and does not take into account your investment objectives, financial situation or particular needs. You should not act on any information in this report without first consulting a professional investment adviser in order to ascertain whether the information and any investment decision is appropriate. This information is believed to be accurate however no warranty of accuracy or reliability is given in relation to any advice or information contained, and neither TFSA or its Representatives and officers, agents or employees of either of the aforementioned shall not be held liable for any loss or damage whatsoever arising in any way for any representation, act or omission, whether express or implied (including responsibility to any persons by reason of negligence).